Wapen van Amsterdam1

F, #13972
Mother*Ship1

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Last Edited16/04/2015
(Fleet) ShipVoyage On 4 December 1656 the Amersfoort, Wapen van Amsterdam, Dordrecht, Wapen van Holland, Westfriesland and Prins Willem, ships of the return fleet, left Batavia enroute to the Cape Catharina van Paliacatta, while the Prins Willem brought the slaves Angela van Bengale, Elisabeth van Bengale, Jan van Bengale, Claes van Bengale and Anna van Bengalen.2 
ShipVoyage* On 13 October 1657 the Wapen van Amsterdam departed Vlie enroute to de Caep de Goede Hoop where it docked on 26 March 1658. Among those on board was Margarita Meeckhoff.3,4 
ShipVoyage On 27 September 1661 the Wapen van Amsterdam departed Vlie enroute to de Caep de Goede Hoop where it docked on 30 January 1662. On board were Grietie Gerrits, Maria Jansz Visser, Gerrit Jans Visser and Geesie Visser. Their passage had been paid for by the Company. Mansell Upham notes that it was rare for families of free-burghers to immigrate to the Cape during the early years of the colony.5,6,7 

Citations

  1. [S654] Mansell Upham 'What can't be cured, must be endured … Cape of Good Hope - first marriages & baptisms (1652-1665)', First Fifty Years, Uprooted Lives - Unfurling the Cape of Good Hope's Earliest Colonial Inhabitants (1652-1713), (http://e-family.co.za/ffy/ui66.htm), January 2012.
  2. [S815] Mansell G. Upham 'Documented Slave Arrivals at the Cape of Good Hope (1652-1677)', First Fifty Years, Uprooted Lives - Unfurling the Cape of Good Hope's Earliest Colonial Inhabitants (1652-1713), (Unpublished), 16 November 2014. "21 February 1657:     Return Fleet ex Batavia arrives:
    Prins Willem brings exiled convict (Company slave)
    Catharina (Groote Catrijn) van Paliacatta [Pulicat]
    Amersfoort brings 5 private slaves
    Angela / Engela (Maaij Ansela / Moeder Jagt) van Bengale [sold to Jan van Riebeeck]
    Elisabeth (Lijsbeth) van Bengale [misrecorded as Domingo [sic] - sold to Jan van Riebeeck]
    Jan van Bengale [sold to Jan Vetteman]
    Claes van Bengale [sold to Jochum Cornelisz: Blancq (from Lübeck)]
    Anna van Bengale [sold to Jochum Cornelisz: Blancq (from Lübeck)].
    "
  3. [S654] Mansell Upham 'UL01 What can't be cured, must be endured …', Uprooted Lives - Unfurling the Cape of Good Hope's Earliest Colonial Inhabitants (1652-1713), "26 March 1658: Wapen van Amsterdam brings Grietjen Fransz: Meeckhoff (from Steenwijk) (future wife to Hendrik Snijer & Willem van Dieden)."
  4. [S795] Website The Dutch East India Company's shipping between the Netherlands and Asia 1595-1795 (http://resources.huygens.knaw.nl/das/search) "Number     0879.2
    Name of ship     WAPEN VAN AMSTERDAM
    Master     Wolf, Andries (died)
    Tonnage     920
    Type of ship     
    Built     1653
    Yard     Amsterdam
    Chamber     Amsterdam
    Date of departure     13-10-1657
    Place of departure     Vlie
    Arrival at Cape     26-03-1658
    Departure from Cape     09-04-1658
    Date of arrival at destination     04-07-1658
    Place of arrival     Batavia
    Particulars     During the voyage Andries Wolf died; Jan Jansz. Vlodrop succeeded him as master. The 16 'passengers' who embarked at the Cape were slaves, 12 of them arrived at Batavia."
  5. [S654] Mansell Upham 'UL01 What can't be cured, must be endured …', Uprooted Lives - Unfurling the Cape of Good Hope's Earliest Colonial Inhabitants (1652-1713), "30 January 1662:     Wapen van Amsterdam brings: wife of Johannes (Jan Grof) Coenraed(sz): / Coenraet[sz:] Visser (from Ommen) Geertjen [? Alida (Aeltje)] Gerrits: with 3 children; Maria Jans: Visser [already wife to Willem Willemsz: de Lierman (from Deventer [Overijssel]); Gerrit Jansz: Visser; Gesina (Geesje) Jans: Visser. Also:
    The Company financed a passage for his wife and three children to the Cape (30 January 1662) on board the Wapen van Amsterdam, viz: "At your request we have granted a passage to one or two wives [those of Grof & Willem de Lierman?] whose husbands are at the Cape, subject to the usual condition to remain their fifteen years. The wife of Jan Coenraetsz [Visser] we have given f 25 for her outfit, which you may recover there" [as transcribed from 'Leibbrandt' Letters Received, vol. II, p. 183, (Letter from Amsterdam, 19 September 1661)]."
  6. [S406] H.B. Thom, editor, Journal of Jan van Riebeeck Vol III 1659-1662 translated by J. Smuts from the original Dutch, (Cape Town, Amsterdam: A.A. Balkema, 1954), [30 January 1662] A N.W. breeze blowing during the afternoon, by means of which the above vessel safely arrived on the roadstead. The Fiscal landed with the letters, but they contained nothing that was necessary to be despatched in the Nachtegael. About the same time the skipper Jan van Campen and the junior merchant Casper van Dalen also landed and reported their vessel to be the Wapen van Amsterdam, which had left the Vlie on the 27th September, 1661, in company of the Amersfoort, with 350 men, of whom only three had died and 2 been drowned The rest were in good health. She had called nowhere and had lost sight of the Amersfoort the same day that she left. The Malacca was then also ready to leave the Vlie.. Hereinafter cited as Journal of Jan van Riebeeck Vol III 1659-1662.
  7. [S657] Mansell Upham 'Hell and Paradise... Hope on Constantia / De Hel en Het Paradijs... De Hoop op Constantia: Jan Grof (died ante 1700) and his extended family at the Cape of Good Hope', First Fifty Years, Uprooted Lives - Unfurling the Cape of Good Hope's Earliest Colonial Inhabitants (1652-1713), (http://e-family.co.za/ffy/ui66.htm), February 2012. "p.14. Emigration of a free-burgher’s family to the Cape was exceptional during the early years of the colony."
 

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